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Papers


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Stochastic Backpropagation through Mixture Density Distributions

Alex Graves

The ability to backpropagate stochastic gradients through continuous latent distributions has been crucial to the emergence of variational autoencoders and stochastic gradient variational Bayes. The key ingredient is an unbiased and low-variance way of estimating gradients with respect to distribution parameters from gradients evaluated at distribution samples. The "reparameterization trick" provides a class of transforms yielding such estimators for many continuous distributions, including the Gaussian and other members of the location-scale family. However the trick does not readily extend to mixture density models, due to the difficulty of reparameterizing the discrete distribution over mixture weights. This report describes an alternative transform, applicable to any continuous multivariate distribution with a differentiable density function from which samples can be drawn, and uses it to derive an unbiased estimator for mixture density weight derivatives. Combined with the reparameterization trick applied to the individual mixture components, this estimator makes it straightforward to train variational autoencoders with mixture-distributed latent variables, or to perform stochastic variational inference with a mixture density variational posterior.

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Recurrent Highway Networks

Julian Georg Zilly, Rupesh Kumar Srivastava, Jan Koutník, Jürgen Schmidhuber

Many sequential processing tasks require complex nonlinear transition functions from one step to the next. However, recurrent neural networks with such 'deep' transition functions remain difficult to train, even when using Long Short-Term Memory networks. We introduce a novel theoretical analysis of recurrent networks based on Gersgorin's circle theorem that illuminates several modeling and optimization issues and improves our understanding of the LSTM cell. Based on this analysis we propose Recurrent Highway Networks, which are long not only in time but also in space, generalizing LSTMs to larger step-to-step depths. Experiments indicate that the proposed architecture results in complex but efficient models, beating previous models for character prediction on the Hutter Prize Wikipedia dataset and word-level language modeling on the Penn Treebank corpus.

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Recurrent Memory Array Structures

Kamil Rocki

The following report introduces ideas augmenting standard Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) architecture with multiple memory cells per hidden unit in order to improve its generalization capabilities. It considers both deterministic and stochastic variants of memory operation. It is shown that the nondeterministic Array-LSTM approach improves state-of-the-art performance on character level text prediction achieving 1.402 BPC on enwik8 dataset. Furthermore, this report estabilishes baseline neural-based results of 1.12 BPC and 1.19 BPC for enwik9 and enwik10 datasets respectively.

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Deep Depth Super-Resolution : Learning Depth Super-Resolution using Deep Convolutional Neural Network

Xibin Song, Yuchao Dai, Xueying Qin

Depth image super-resolution is an extremely challenging task due to the information loss in sub-sampling. Deep convolutional neural network have been widely applied to color image super-resolution. Quite surprisingly, this success has not been matched to depth super-resolution. This is mainly due to the inherent difference between color and depth images. In this paper, we bridge up the gap and extend the success of deep convolutional neural network to depth super-resolution. The proposed deep depth super-resolution method learns the mapping from a low-resolution depth image to a high resolution one in an end-to-end style. Furthermore, to better regularize the learned depth map, we propose to exploit the depth field statistics and the local correlation between depth image and color image. These priors are integrated in an energy minimization formulation, where the deep neural network learns the unary term, the depth field statistics works as global model constraint and the color-depth correlation is utilized to enforce the local structure in depth images. Extensive experiments on various depth super-resolution benchmark datasets show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art depth image super-resolution methods with a margin.

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Deep Learning with Differential Privacy

Martín Abadi, Andy Chu, Ian Goodfellow, H. Brendan McMahan, Ilya Mironov, Kunal Talwar, Li Zhang

Machine learning techniques based on neural networks are achieving remarkable results in a wide variety of domains. Often, the training of models requires large, representative datasets, which may be crowdsourced and contain sensitive information. The models should not expose private information in these datasets. Addressing this goal, we develop new algorithmic techniques for learning and a refined analysis of privacy costs within the framework of differential privacy. Our implementation and experiments demonstrate that we can train deep neural networks with non-convex objectives, under a modest privacy budget, and at a manageable cost in software complexity, training efficiency, and model quality.

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Convolutional Neural Networks on Graphs with Fast Localized Spectral Filtering

Michaël Defferrard, Xavier Bresson, Pierre Vandergheynst

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have greatly improved state-of-the-art performances in a number of fields, notably computer vision and natural language processing. In this work, we are interested in generalizing the formulation of CNNs from low-dimensional regular Euclidean domains, where images (2D), videos (3D) and audios (1D) are represented, to high-dimensional irregular domains such as social networks or biological networks represented by graphs. This paper introduces a formulation of CNNs on graphs in the context of spectral graph theory. We borrow the fundamental tools from the emerging field of signal processing on graphs, which provides the necessary mathematical background and efficient numerical schemes to design localized graph filters efficient to learn and evaluate. As a matter of fact, we introduce the first technique that offers the same computational complexity than standard CNNs, while being universal to any graph structure. Numerical experiments on MNIST and 20NEWS demonstrate the ability of this novel deep learning system to learn local, stationary, and compositional features on graphs, as long as the graph is well-constructed.

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Compression of Neural Machine Translation Models via Pruning

Abigail See, Minh-Thang Luong, Christopher D. Manning

Neural Machine Translation (NMT), like many other deep learning domains, typically suffers from over-parameterization, resulting in large storage sizes. This paper examines three simple magnitude-based pruning schemes to compress NMT models, namely class-blind, class-uniform, and class-distribution, which differ in terms of how pruning thresholds are computed for the different classes of weights in the NMT architecture. We demonstrate the efficacy of weight pruning as a compression technique for a state-of-the-art NMT system. We show that an NMT model with over 200 million parameters can be pruned by 40% with very little performance loss as measured on the WMT'14 English-German translation task. This sheds light on the distribution of redundancy in the NMT architecture. Our main result is that with retraining, we can recover and even surpass the original performance with an 80%-pruned model.

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subgraph2vec: Learning Distributed Representations of Rooted Sub-graphs from Large Graphs

Annamalai Narayanan, Mahinthan Chandramohan, Lihui Chen, Yang Liu, Santhoshkumar Saminathan

In this paper, we present subgraph2vec, a novel approach for learning latent representations of rooted subgraphs from large graphs inspired by recent advancements in Deep Learning and Graph Kernels. These latent representations encode semantic substructure dependencies in a continuous vector space, which is easily exploited by statistical models for tasks such as graph classification, clustering, link prediction and community detection. subgraph2vec leverages on local information obtained from neighbourhoods of nodes to learn their latent representations in an unsupervised fashion. We demonstrate that subgraph vectors learnt by our approach could be used in conjunction with classifiers such as CNNs, SVMs and relational data clustering algorithms to achieve significantly superior accuracies. Also, we show that the subgraph vectors could be used for building a deep learning variant of Weisfeiler-Lehman graph kernel. Our experiments on several benchmark and large-scale real-world datasets reveal that subgraph2vec achieves significant improvements in accuracies over existing graph kernels on both supervised and unsupervised learning tasks. Specifically, on two realworld program analysis tasks, namely, code clone and malware detection, subgraph2vec outperforms state-of-the-art kernels by more than 17% and 4%, respectively.

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Sequence-Level Knowledge Distillation

Yoon Kim, Alexander M. Rush

Neural machine translation (NMT) offers a novel alternative formulation of translation that is potentially simpler than statistical approaches. However to reach competitive performance, NMT models need to be exceedingly large. In this paper we consider applying knowledge distillation approaches (Bucila et al., 2006; Hinton et al., 2015) that have proven successful for reducing the size of neural models in other domains to the problem of NMT. We demonstrate that standard knowledge distillation applied to word-level prediction can be effective for NMT, and also introduce two novel sequence-level versions of knowledge distillation that further improve performance, and somewhat surprisingly, seem to eliminate the need for beam search (even when applied on the original teacher model). Our best student model runs 10 times faster than its state-of-the-art teacher with little loss in performance. It is also significantly better than a baseline model trained without knowledge distillation: by 4.2/1.7 BLEU with greedy decoding/beam search. Applying weight pruning on top of knowledge distillation results in a student model that has 13 times fewer parameters than the original teacher model, with a decrease of 0.4 BLEU.

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Issues in evaluating semantic spaces using word analogies

Tal Linzen

The offset method for solving word analogies has become a standard evaluation tool for vector-space semantic models: it is considered desirable for a space to represent semantic relations as consistent vector offsets. We show that the method's reliance on cosine similarity conflates offset consistency with largely irrelevant neighborhood structure, and propose simple baselines that should be used to improve the utility of the method in vector space evaluation.

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Visual Analysis of Hidden State Dynamics in Recurrent Neural Networks

Hendrik Strobelt, Sebastian Gehrmann, Bernd Huber, Hanspeter Pfister, Alexander M. Rush

Recurrent neural networks, and in particular long short-term memory networks (LSTMs), are a remarkably effective tool for sequence modeling that learn a dense black-box hidden representation of their sequential input. Researchers interested in better understanding these models have studied the changes in hidden state representations over time and noticed some interpretable patterns but also significant noise. In this work, we present LSTMVis a visual analysis tool for recurrent neural networks with a focus on understanding these hidden state dynamics. The tool allows a user to select a hypothesis input range to focus on local state changes, to match these states changes to similar patterns in a large data set, and to align these results with domain specific structural annotations. We further show several use cases of the tool for analyzing specific hidden state properties on datasets containing nesting, phrase structure, and chord progressions, and demonstrate how the tool can be used to isolate patterns for further statistical analysis.

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Algorithmic Composition of Melodies with Deep Recurrent Neural Networks

Florian Colombo, Samuel P. Muscinelli, Alexander Seeholzer, Johanni Brea, Wulfram Gerstner

A big challenge in algorithmic composition is to devise a model that is both easily trainable and able to reproduce the long-range temporal dependencies typical of music. Here we investigate how artificial neural networks can be trained on a large corpus of melodies and turned into automated music composers able to generate new melodies coherent with the style they have been trained on. We employ gated recurrent unit networks that have been shown to be particularly efficient in learning complex sequential activations with arbitrary long time lags. Our model processes rhythm and melody in parallel while modeling the relation between these two features. Using such an approach, we were able to generate interesting complete melodies or suggest possible continuations of a melody fragment that is coherent with the characteristics of the fragment itself.

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Tagger: Deep Unsupervised Perceptual Grouping

Klaus Greff, Antti Rasmus, Mathias Berglund, Tele Hotloo Hao, Jürgen Schmidhuber, Harri Valpola

We present a framework for efficient perceptual inference that explicitly reasons about the segmentation of its inputs and features. Rather than being trained for any specific segmentation, our framework learns the grouping process in an unsupervised manner or alongside any supervised task. By enriching the representations of a neural network, we enable it to group the representations of different objects in an iterative manner. By allowing the system to amortize the iterative inference of the groupings, we achieve very fast convergence. In contrast to many other recently proposed methods for addressing multi-object scenes, our system does not assume the inputs to be images and can therefore directly handle other modalities. For multi-digit classification of very cluttered images that require texture segmentation, our method offers improved classification performance over convolutional networks despite being fully connected. Furthermore, we observe that our system greatly improves on the semi-supervised result of a baseline Ladder network on our dataset, indicating that segmentation can also improve sample efficiency.

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On Multiplicative Integration with Recurrent Neural Networks

Yuhuai Wu, Saizheng Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yoshua Bengio, Ruslan Salakhutdinov

We introduce a general and simple structural design called Multiplicative Integration (MI) to improve recurrent neural networks (RNNs). MI changes the way in which information from difference sources flows and is integrated in the computational building block of an RNN, while introducing almost no extra parameters. The new structure can be easily embedded into many popular RNN models, including LSTMs and GRUs. We empirically analyze its learning behaviour and conduct evaluations on several tasks using different RNN models. Our experimental results demonstrate that Multiplicative Integration can provide a substantial performance boost over many of the existing RNN models.

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Concrete Problems in AI Safety

Dario Amodei, Chris Olah, Jacob Steinhardt, Paul Christiano, John Schulman, Dan Mané

Rapid progress in machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) has brought increasing attention to the potential impacts of AI technologies on society. In this paper we discuss one such potential impact: the problem of accidents in machine learning systems, defined as unintended and harmful behavior that may emerge from poor design of real-world AI systems. We present a list of five practical research problems related to accident risk, categorized according to whether the problem originates from having the wrong objective function ("avoiding side effects" and "avoiding reward hacking"), an objective function that is too expensive to evaluate frequently ("scalable supervision"), or undesirable behavior during the learning process ("safe exploration" and "distributional shift"). We review previous work in these areas as well as suggesting research directions with a focus on relevance to cutting-edge AI systems. Finally, we consider the high-level question of how to think most productively about the safety of forward-looking applications of AI.

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Drawing and Recognizing Chinese Characters with Recurrent Neural Network

Xu-Yao Zhang, Fei Yin, Yan-Ming Zhang, Cheng-Lin Liu, Yoshua Bengio

Recent deep learning based approaches have achieved great success on handwriting recognition. Chinese characters are among the most widely adopted writing systems in the world. Previous research has mainly focused on recognizing handwritten Chinese characters. However, recognition is only one aspect for understanding a language, another challenging and interesting task is to teach a machine to automatically write (pictographic) Chinese characters. In this paper, we propose a framework by using the recurrent neural network (RNN) as both a discriminative model for recognizing Chinese characters and a generative model for drawing (generating) Chinese characters. To recognize Chinese characters, previous methods usually adopt the convolutional neural network (CNN) models which require transforming the online handwriting trajectory into image-like representations. Instead, our RNN based approach is an end-to-end system which directly deals with the sequential structure and does not require any domain-specific knowledge. With the RNN system (combining an LSTM and GRU), state-of-the-art performance can be achieved on the ICDAR-2013 competition database. Furthermore, under the RNN framework, a conditional generative model with character embedding is proposed for automatically drawing recognizable Chinese characters. The generated characters (in vector format) are human-readable and also can be recognized by the discriminative RNN model with high accuracy. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of using RNNs as both generative and discriminative models for the tasks of drawing and recognizing Chinese characters.

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Colorization for Image Compression

Mohammad Haris Baig, Lorenzo Torresani

In this work we focus on the problem of colorization for image compression. Since color information occupies a large proportion of the total storage size of an image, a method that can predict accurate color from its grayscale version can produce dramatic reduction in image file size. But colorization for compression poses several challenges. First, while colorization for artistic purposes simply involves predicting plausible chroma, colorization for compression requires generating output colors that are as close as possible to the ground truth. Second, many objects in the real world exhibit multiple possible colors. Thus, to disambiguate the colorization problem some additional information must be stored to reproduce the true colors with good accuracy. To account for the multimodal color distribution of objects we propose a deep tree-structured network that generates multiple color hypotheses for every pixel from a grayscale picture (as opposed to a single color produced by most prior colorization approaches). We show how to leverage the multimodal output of our model to reproduce with high fidelity the true colors of an image by storing very little additional information. In the experiments we show that our proposed method outperforms traditional JPEG color coding by a large margin, producing colors that are nearly indistinguishable from the ground truth at the storage cost of just a few hundred bytes for high-resolution pictures!

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DoReFa-Net: Training Low Bitwidth Convolutional Neural Networks with Low Bitwidth Gradients

Shuchang Zhou, Yuxin Wu, Zekun Ni, Xinyu Zhou, He Wen, Yuheng Zou

We propose DoReFa-Net, a method to train convolutional neural networks that have low bitwidth weights and activations using low bitwidth parameter gradients. In particular, during backward pass, parameter gradients are stochastically quantized to low bitwidth numbers before being propagated to convolutional layers. As convolutions during forward/backward passes can now operate on low bitwidth weights and activations/gradients respectively, DoReFa-Net can use bit convolution kernels to accelerate both training and inference. Moreover, as bit convolutions can be efficiently implemented on CPU, FPGA, ASIC and GPU, DoReFa-Net opens the way to accelerate training of low bitwidth neural network on these hardware. Our experiments on SVHN and ImageNet datasets prove that DoReFa-Net can achieve comparable prediction accuracy as 32-bit counterparts. For example, a DoReFa-Net derived from AlexNet that has 1-bit weights, 2-bit activations, can be trained from scratch using 6-bit gradients to get 46.1\% top-1 accuracy on ImageNet validation set. The DoReFa-Net AlexNet model is released publicly.

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Quantifying and Reducing Stereotypes in Word Embeddings

Tolga Bolukbasi, Kai-Wei Chang, James Zou, Venkatesh Saligrama, Adam Kalai

Machine learning algorithms are optimized to model statistical properties of the training data. If the input data reflects stereotypes and biases of the broader society, then the output of the learning algorithm also captures these stereotypes. In this paper, we initiate the study of gender stereotypes in {\em word embedding}, a popular framework to represent text data. As their use becomes increasingly common, applications can inadvertently amplify unwanted stereotypes. We show across multiple datasets that the embeddings contain significant gender stereotypes, especially with regard to professions. We created a novel gender analogy task and combined it with crowdsourcing to systematically quantify the gender bias in a given embedding. We developed an efficient algorithm that reduces gender stereotype using just a handful of training examples while preserving the useful geometric properties of the embedding. We evaluated our algorithm on several metrics. While we focus on male/female stereotypes, our framework may be applicable to other types of embedding biases.

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Early Visual Concept Learning with Unsupervised Deep Learning

Irina Higgins, Loic Matthey, Xavier Glorot, Arka Pal, Benigno Uria, Charles Blundell, Shakir Mohamed, Alexander Lerchner

Automated discovery of early visual concepts from raw image data is a major open challenge in AI research. Addressing this problem, we propose an unsupervised approach for learning disentangled representations of the underlying factors of variation. We draw inspiration from neuroscience, and show how this can be achieved in an unsupervised generative model by applying the same learning pressures as have been suggested to act in the ventral visual stream in the brain. By enforcing redundancy reduction, encouraging statistical independence, and exposure to data with transform continuities analogous to those to which human infants are exposed, we obtain a variational autoencoder (VAE) framework capable of learning disentangled factors. Our approach makes few assumptions and works well across a wide variety of datasets. Furthermore, our solution has useful emergent properties, such as zero-shot inference and an intuitive understanding of "objectness".

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