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Learning from Dialogue after Deployment: Feed Yourself, Chatbot!

Braden Hancock, Antoine Bordes, Pierre-Emmanuel Mazare, Jason Weston

The majority of conversations a dialogue agent sees over its lifetime occur after it has already been trained and deployed, leaving a vast store of potential training signal untapped. In this work, we propose the self-feeding chatbot, a dialogue agent with the ability to extract new training examples from the conversations it participates in. As our agent engages in conversation, it also estimates user satisfaction in its responses. When the conversation appears to be going well, the user's responses become new training examples to imitate. When the agent believes it has made a mistake, it asks for feedback; learning to predict the feedback that will be given improves the chatbot's dialogue abilities further. On the PersonaChat chit-chat dataset with over 131k training examples, we find that learning from dialogue with a self-feeding chatbot significantly improves performance, regardless of the amount of traditional supervision.

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DeepSDF: Learning Continuous Signed Distance Functions for Shape Representation

Jeong Joon Park, Peter Florence, Julian Straub, Richard Newcombe, Steven Lovegrove

Computer graphics, 3D computer vision and robotics communities have produced multiple approaches to representing 3D geometry for rendering and reconstruction. These provide trade-offs across fidelity, efficiency and compression capabilities. In this work, we introduce DeepSDF, a learned continuous Signed Distance Function (SDF) representation of a class of shapes that enables high quality shape representation, interpolation and completion from partial and noisy 3D input data. DeepSDF, like its classical counterpart, represents a shape's surface by a continuous volumetric field: the magnitude of a point in the field represents the distance to the surface boundary and the sign indicates whether the region is inside (-) or outside (+) of the shape, hence our representation implicitly encodes a shape's boundary as the zero-level-set of the learned function while explicitly representing the classification of space as being part of the shapes interior or not. While classical SDF's both in analytical or discretized voxel form typically represent the surface of a single shape, DeepSDF can represent an entire class of shapes. Furthermore, we show state-of-the-art performance for learned 3D shape representation and completion while reducing the model size by an order of magnitude compared with previous work.

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Eliminating all bad Local Minima from Loss Landscapes without even adding an Extra Unit

Jascha Sohl-Dickstein, Kenji Kawaguchi

Recent work has noted that all bad local minima can be removed from neural network loss landscapes, by adding a single unit with a particular parameterization. We show that the core technique from these papers can be used to remove all bad local minima from any loss landscape, so long as the global minimum has a loss of zero. This procedure does not require the addition of auxiliary units, or even that the loss be associated with a neural network. The method of action involves all bad local minima being converted into bad (non-local) minima at infinity in terms of auxiliary parameters.

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Variation Network: Learning High-level Attributes for Controlled Input Manipulation

Gaëtan Hadjeres

This paper presents the Variation Network (VarNet), a generative model providing means to manipulate the high-level attributes of a given input. The originality of our approach is that VarNet is not only capable of handling pre-defined attributes but can also learn the relevant attributes of the dataset by itself. These two settings can be easily combined which makes VarNet applicable for a wide variety of tasks. Further, VarNet has a sound probabilistic interpretation which grants us with a novel way to navigate in the latent spaces as well as means to control how the attributes are learned. We demonstrate experimentally that this model is capable of performing interesting input manipulation and that the learned attributes are relevant and interpretable.

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UAV-GESTURE: A Dataset for UAV Control and Gesture Recognition

Asanka G Perera, Yee Wei Law, Javaan Chahl

Current UAV-recorded datasets are mostly limited to action recognition and object tracking, whereas the gesture signals datasets were mostly recorded in indoor spaces. Currently, there is no outdoor recorded public video dataset for UAV commanding signals. Gesture signals can be effectively used with UAVs by leveraging the UAVs visual sensors and operational simplicity. To fill this gap and enable research in wider application areas, we present a UAV gesture signals dataset recorded in an outdoor setting. We selected 13 gestures suitable for basic UAV navigation and command from general aircraft handling and helicopter handling signals. We provide 119 high-definition video clips consisting of 37151 frames. The overall baseline gesture recognition performance computed using Pose-based Convolutional Neural Network (P-CNN) is 91.9 %. All the frames are annotated with body joints and gesture classes in order to extend the dataset's applicability to a wider research area including gesture recognition, action recognition, human pose recognition and situation awareness.

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DPPNet: Approximating Determinantal Point Processes with Deep Networks

Zelda Mariet, Yaniv Ovadia, Jasper Snoek

Determinantal Point Processes (DPPs) provide an elegant and versatile way to sample sets of items that balance the point-wise quality with the set-wise diversity of selected items. For this reason, they have gained prominence in many machine learning applications that rely on subset selection. However, sampling from a DPP over a ground set of size $N$ is a costly operation, requiring in general an $O(N^3)$ preprocessing cost and an $O(Nk^3)$ sampling cost for subsets of size $k$. We approach this problem by introducing DPPNets: generative deep models that produce DPP-like samples for arbitrary ground sets. We develop an inhibitive attention mechanism based on transformer networks that captures a notion of dissimilarity between feature vectors. We show theoretically that such an approximation is sensible as it maintains the guarantees of inhibition or dissimilarity that makes DPPs so powerful and unique. Empirically, we demonstrate that samples from our model receive high likelihood under the more expensive DPP alternative.

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Massively Multilingual Sentence Embeddings for Zero-Shot Cross-Lingual Transfer and Beyond

Mikel Artetxe, Holger Schwenk

We introduce an architecture to learn joint multilingual sentence representations for 93 languages, belonging to more than 30 different language families and written in 28 different scripts. Our system uses a single BiLSTM encoder with a shared BPE vocabulary for all languages, which is coupled with an auxiliary decoder and trained on publicly available parallel corpora. This enables us to learn a classifier on top of the resulting sentence embeddings using English annotated data only, and transfer it to any of the 93 languages without any modification. Our approach sets a new state-of-the-art on zero-shot cross-lingual natural language inference for all the 14 languages in the XNLI dataset but one. We also achieve very competitive results in cross-lingual document classification (MLDoc dataset). Our sentence embeddings are also strong at parallel corpus mining, establishing a new state-of-the-art in the BUCC shared task for 3 of its 4 language pairs. Finally, we introduce a new test set of aligned sentences in 122 languages based on the Tatoeba corpus, and show that our sentence embeddings obtain strong results in multilingual similarity search even for low-resource languages. Our PyTorch implementation, pre-trained encoder and the multilingual test set will be freely available.

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The Design and Implementation of XiaoIce, an Empathetic Social Chatbot

Li Zhou, Jianfeng Gao, Di Li, Heung-Yeung Shum

This paper describes the development of the Microsoft XiaoIce system, the most popular social chatbot in the world. XiaoIce is uniquely designed as an AI companion with an emotional connection to satisfy the human need for communication, affection, and social belonging. We take into account both intelligent quotient (IQ) and emotional quotient (EQ) in system design, cast human-machine social chat as decision-making over Markov Decision Processes (MDPs), and optimize XiaoIce for long-term user engagement, measured in expected Conversation-turns Per Session (CPS). We detail the system architecture and key components including dialogue manager, core chat, skills, and an empathetic computing module. We show how XiaoIce dynamically recognizes human feelings and states, understands user intents, and responds to user needs throughout long conversations. Since the release in 2014, XiaoIce has communicated with over 660 million users and succeeded in establishing long-term relationships with many of them. Analysis of large-scale online logs shows that XiaoIce has achieved an average CPS of 23, which is significantly higher than that of other chatbots and even human conversations.

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Bayesian Optimization in AlphaGo

Yutian Chen, Aja Huang, Ziyu Wang, Ioannis Antonoglou, Julian Schrittwieser, David Silver, Nando de Freitas

During the development of AlphaGo, its many hyper-parameters were tuned with Bayesian optimization multiple times. This automatic tuning process resulted in substantial improvements in playing strength. For example, prior to the match with Lee Sedol, we tuned the latest AlphaGo agent and this improved its win-rate from 50% to 66.5% in self-play games. This tuned version was deployed in the final match. Of course, since we tuned AlphaGo many times during its development cycle, the compounded contribution was even higher than this percentage. It is our hope that this brief case study will be of interest to Go fans, and also provide Bayesian optimization practitioners with some insights and inspiration.

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A Tutorial on Deep Latent Variable Models of Natural Language

Yoon Kim, Sam Wiseman, Alexander M. Rush

There has been much recent, exciting work on combining the complementary strengths of latent variable models and deep learning. Latent variable modeling makes it easy to explicitly specify model constraints through conditional independence properties, while deep learning makes it possible to parameterize these conditional likelihoods with powerful function approximators. While these "deep latent variable" models provide a rich, flexible framework for modeling many real-world phenomena, difficulties exist: deep parameterizations of conditional likelihoods usually make posterior inference intractable, and latent variable objectives often complicate backpropagation by introducing points of non-differentiability. This tutorial explores these issues in depth through the lens of variational inference.

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A Style-Based Generator Architecture for Generative Adversarial Networks

Tero Karras, Samuli Laine, Timo Aila

We propose an alternative generator architecture for generative adversarial networks, borrowing from style transfer literature. The new architecture leads to an automatically learned, unsupervised separation of high-level attributes (e.g., pose and identity when trained on human faces) and stochastic variation in the generated images (e.g., freckles, hair), and it enables intuitive, scale-specific control of the synthesis. The new generator improves the state-of-the-art in terms of traditional distribution quality metrics, leads to demonstrably better interpolation properties, and also better disentangles the latent factors of variation. To quantify interpolation quality and disentanglement, we propose two new, automated methods that are applicable to any generator architecture. Finally, we introduce a new, highly varied and high-quality dataset of human faces.

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Residual Reinforcement Learning for Robot Control

Tobias Johannink, Shikhar Bahl, Ashvin Nair, Jianlan Luo, Avinash Kumar, Matthias Loskyll, Juan Aparicio Ojea, Eugen Solowjow, Sergey Levine

Conventional feedback control methods can solve various types of robot control problems very efficiently by capturing the structure with explicit models, such as rigid body equations of motion. However, many control problems in modern manufacturing deal with contacts and friction, which are difficult to capture with first-order physical modeling. Hence, applying control design methodologies to these kinds of problems often results in brittle and inaccurate controllers, which have to be manually tuned for deployment. Reinforcement learning (RL) methods have been demonstrated to be capable of learning continuous robot controllers from interactions with the environment, even for problems that include friction and contacts. In this paper, we study how we can solve difficult control problems in the real world by decomposing them into a part that is solved efficiently by conventional feedback control methods, and the residual which is solved with RL. The final control policy is a superposition of both control signals. We demonstrate our approach by training an agent to successfully perform a real-world block assembly task involving contacts and unstable objects.

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Provably Efficient Maximum Entropy Exploration

Elad Hazan, Sham M. Kakade, Karan Singh, Abby Van Soest

Suppose an agent is in a (possibly unknown) Markov decision process (MDP) in the absence of a reward signal, what might we hope that an agent can efficiently learn to do? One natural, intrinsically defined, objective problem is for the agent to learn a policy which induces a distribution over state space that is as uniform as possible, which can be measured in an entropic sense. Despite the corresponding mathematical program being non-convex, our main result provides a provably efficient method (both in terms of sample size and computational complexity) to construct such a maximum-entropy exploratory policy. Key to our algorithmic methodology is utilizing the conditional gradient method (a.k.a. the Frank-Wolfe algorithm) which utilizes an approximate MDP solver.

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Generative Adversarial Network based Speaker Adaptation for High Fidelity WaveNet Vocoder

Qiao Tian, Bing Yang, Jing Chen, Benlai Tang, Shan Liu

Neural networks based vocoders, typically the WaveNet, have achieved spectacular performance for text-to-speech (TTS) in recent years. Although state-of-the-art parallel WaveNet has addressed the issue of real-time waveform generation, there remains problems. Firstly, due to the noisy input signal of the model, there is still a gap between the quality of generated and natural waveforms. Secondly, a parallel WaveNet is trained under a distilled training framework, which makes it tedious to adapt a well trained model to a new speaker. To address these two problems, this paper proposes an end-to-end adaptation method based on the generative adversarial network (GAN), which can reduce the computational cost for the training of new speaker adaptation. Our subjective experiments shows that the proposed training method can further reduce the quality gap between generated and natural waveforms.

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Learning to Learn How to Learn: Self-Adaptive Visual Navigation Using Meta-Learning

Mitchell Wortsman, Kiana Ehsani, Mohammad Rastegari, Ali Farhadi, Roozbeh Mottaghi

Learning is an inherently continuous phenomenon. When humans learn a new task there is no explicit distinction between training and inference. After we learn a task, we keep learning about it while performing the task. What we learn and how we learn it varies during different stages of learning. Learning how to learn and adapt is a key property that enables us to generalize effortlessly to new settings. This is in contrast with conventional settings in machine learning where a trained model is frozen during inference. In this paper we study the problem of learning to learn at both training and inference time in the context of visual navigation. A fundamental challenge in navigation is generalization to unseen scenes. In this paper we propose a self-adaptive visual navigation method (SAVN) which learns to adapt to new environments without any explicit supervision. Our solution is a meta-reinforcement learning approach where an agent learns a self-supervised interaction loss that encourages effective navigation. Our experiments, performed in the AI2-THOR framework, show major improvements in both success rate and SPL for visual navigation in novel scenes.

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Image Generation from Layout

Bo Zhao, Lili Meng, Weidong Yin, Leonid Sigal

Despite significant recent progress on generative models, controlled generation of images depicting multiple and complex object layouts is still a difficult problem. Among the core challenges are the diversity of appearance a given object may possess and, as a result, exponential set of images consistent with a specified layout. To address these challenges, we propose a novel approach for layout-based image generation; we call it Layout2Im. Given the coarse spatial layout (bounding boxes + object categories), our model can generate a set of realistic images which have the correct objects in the desired locations. The representation of each object is disentangled into a specified/certain part (category) and an unspecified/uncertain part (appearance). The category is encoded using a word embedding and the appearance is distilled into a low-dimensional vector sampled from a normal distribution. Individual object representations are composed together using convolutional LSTM, to obtain an encoding of the complete layout, and then decoded to an image. Several loss terms are introduced to encourage accurate and diverse generation. The proposed Layout2Im model significantly outperforms the previous state of the art, boosting the best reported inception score by 24.66% and 28.57% on the very challenging COCO-Stuff and Visual Genome datasets, respectively. Extensive experiments also demonstrate our method's ability to generate complex and diverse images with multiple objects.

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Amortized Bayesian inference for clustering models

Ari Pakman, Liam Paninski

We develop methods for efficient amortized approximate Bayesian inference over posterior distributions of probabilistic clustering models, such as Dirichlet process mixture models. The approach is based on mapping distributed, symmetry-invariant representations of cluster arrangements into conditional probabilities. The method parallelizes easily, yields iid samples from the approximate posterior of cluster assignments with the same computational cost of a single Gibbs sampler sweep, and can easily be applied to both conjugate and non-conjugate models, as training only requires samples from the generative model.

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Rethinking ImageNet Pre-training

Kaiming He, Ross Girshick, Piotr Dollár

We report competitive results on object detection and instance segmentation on the COCO dataset using standard models trained from random initialization. The results are no worse than their ImageNet pre-training counterparts even when using the hyper-parameters of the baseline system (Mask R-CNN) that were optimized for fine-tuning pre-trained models, with the sole exception of increasing the number of training iterations so the randomly initialized models may converge. Training from random initialization is surprisingly robust; our results hold even when: (i) using only 10% of the training data, (ii) for deeper and wider models, and (iii) for multiple tasks and metrics. Experiments show that ImageNet pre-training speeds up convergence early in training, but does not necessarily provide regularization or improve final target task accuracy. To push the envelope we demonstrate 50.9 AP on COCO object detection without using any external data---a result on par with the top COCO 2017 competition results that used ImageNet pre-training. These observations challenge the conventional wisdom of ImageNet pre-training for dependent tasks and we expect these discoveries will encourage people to rethink the current de facto paradigm of `pre-training and fine-tuning' in computer vision.

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Sequential Neural Methods for Likelihood-free Inference

Conor Durkan, George Papamakarios, Iain Murray

Likelihood-free inference refers to inference when a likelihood function cannot be explicitly evaluated, which is often the case for models based on simulators. Most of the literature is based on sample-based `Approximate Bayesian Computation' methods, but recent work suggests that approaches based on deep neural conditional density estimators can obtain state-of-the-art results with fewer simulations. The neural approaches vary in how they choose which simulations to run and what they learn: an approximate posterior or a surrogate likelihood. This work provides some direct controlled comparisons between these choices.

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The PyTorch-Kaldi Speech Recognition Toolkit

Mirco Ravanelli, Titouan Parcollet, Yoshua Bengio

The availability of open-source software is playing a remarkable role in the popularization of speech recognition and deep learning. Kaldi, for instance, is nowadays an established framework used to develop state-of-the-art speech recognizers. PyTorch is used to build neural networks with the Python language and has recently spawn tremendous interest within the machine learning community thanks to its simplicity and flexibility. The PyTorch-Kaldi project aims to bridge the gap between these popular toolkits, trying to inherit the efficiency of Kaldi and the flexibility of PyTorch. PyTorch-Kaldi is not only a simple interface between these software, but it embeds several useful features for developing modern speech recognizers. For instance, the code is specifically designed to naturally plug-in user-defined acoustic models. As an alternative, users can exploit several pre-implemented neural networks that can be customized using intuitive configuration files. PyTorch-Kaldi supports multiple feature and label streams as well as combinations of neural networks, enabling the use of complex neural architectures. The toolkit is publicly-released along with a rich documentation and is designed to properly work locally or on HPC clusters. Experiments, that are conducted on several datasets and tasks, show that PyTorch-Kaldi can effectively be used to develop modern state-of-the-art speech recognizers.

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