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GeneGAN: Learning Object Transfiguration and Attribute Subspace from Unpaired Data

Shuchang Zhou, Taihong Xiao, Yi Yang, Dieqiao Feng, Qinyao He, Weiran He

Object Transfiguration replaces an object in an image with another object from a second image. For example it can perform tasks like "putting exactly those eyeglasses from image A on the nose of the person in image B". Usage of exemplar images allows more precise specification of desired modifications and improves the diversity of conditional image generation. However, previous methods that rely on feature space operations, require paired data and/or appearance models for training or disentangling objects from background. In this work, we propose a model that can learn object transfiguration from two unpaired sets of images: one set containing images that "have" that kind of object, and the other set being the opposite, with the mild constraint that the objects be located approximately at the same place. For example, the training data can be one set of reference face images that have eyeglasses, and another set of images that have not, both of which spatially aligned by face landmarks. Despite the weak 0/1 labels, our model can learn an "eyeglasses" subspace that contain multiple representatives of different types of glasses. Consequently, we can perform fine-grained control of generated images, like swapping the glasses in two images by swapping the projected components in the "eyeglasses" subspace, to create novel images of people wearing eyeglasses. Overall, our deterministic generative model learns disentangled attribute subspaces from weakly labeled data by adversarial training. Experiments on CelebA and Multi-PIE datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed model on real world data, in generating images with specified eyeglasses, smiling, hair styles, and lighting conditions etc. The code is available online.

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DeepTingle

Ahmed Khalifa, Gabriella A. B. Barros, Julian Togelius

DeepTingle is a text prediction and classification system trained on the collected works of the renowned fantastic gay erotica author Chuck Tingle. Whereas the writing assistance tools you use everyday (in the form of predictive text, translation, grammar checking and so on) are trained on generic, purportedly "neutral" datasets, DeepTingle is trained on a very specific, internally consistent but externally arguably eccentric dataset. This allows us to foreground and confront the norms embedded in data-driven creativity and productivity assistance tools. As such tools effectively function as extensions of our cognition into technology, it is important to identify the norms they embed within themselves and, by extension, us. DeepTingle is realized as a web application based on LSTM networks and the GloVe word embedding, implemented in JavaScript with Keras-JS.

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You said that?

Joon Son Chung, Amir Jamaludin, Andrew Zisserman

We present a method for generating a video of a talking face. The method takes as inputs: (i) one still image of the target face, and (ii) an audio speech segment; and outputs a video of the target face lip synched with the audio. The method works in real time, and at run time, is applicable to previously unseen faces and audio (i.e. not part of the training data). To achieve this we propose an encoder-decoder CNN model that uses a joint embedding of the face and audio to generate synthesised talking face video frames. The model is trained on tens of hours of unlabelled videos. We also show results of re-dubbing videos using speech from a different person.

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"Liar, Liar Pants on Fire": A New Benchmark Dataset for Fake News Detection

William Yang Wang

Automatic fake news detection is a challenging problem in deception detection, and it has tremendous real-world political and social impacts. However, statistical approaches to combating fake news has been dramatically limited by the lack of labeled benchmark datasets. In this paper, we present liar: a new, publicly available dataset for fake news detection. We collected a decade-long, 12.8K manually labeled short statements in various contexts from PolitiFact.com, which provides detailed analysis report and links to source documents for each case. This dataset can be used for fact-checking research as well. Notably, this new dataset is an order of magnitude larger than previously largest public fake news datasets of similar type. Empirically, we investigate automatic fake news detection based on surface-level linguistic patterns. We have designed a novel, hybrid convolutional neural network to integrate meta-data with text. We show that this hybrid approach can improve a text-only deep learning model.

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Semi-supervised sequence tagging with bidirectional language models

Matthew E. Peters, Waleed Ammar, Chandra Bhagavatula, Russell Power

Pre-trained word embeddings learned from unlabeled text have become a standard component of neural network architectures for NLP tasks. However, in most cases, the recurrent network that operates on word-level representations to produce context sensitive representations is trained on relatively little labeled data. In this paper, we demonstrate a general semi-supervised approach for adding pre- trained context embeddings from bidirectional language models to NLP systems and apply it to sequence labeling tasks. We evaluate our model on two standard datasets for named entity recognition (NER) and chunking, and in both cases achieve state of the art results, surpassing previous systems that use other forms of transfer or joint learning with additional labeled data and task specific gazetteers.

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Unsupervised Creation of Parameterized Avatars

Lior Wolf, Yaniv Taigman, Adam Polyak

We study the problem of mapping an input image to a tied pair consisting of a vector of parameters and an image that is created using a graphical engine from the vector of parameters. The mapping's objective is to have the output image as similar as possible to the input image. During training, no supervision is given in the form of matching inputs and outputs. This learning problem extends two literature problems: unsupervised domain adaptation and cross domain transfer. We define a generalization bound that is based on discrepancy, and employ a GAN to implement a network solution that corresponds to this bound. Experimentally, our method is shown to solve the problem of automatically creating avatars.

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A Neural Parametric Singing Synthesizer

Merlijn Blaauw, Jordi Bonada

We present a new model for singing synthesis based on a modified version of the WaveNet architecture. Instead of modeling raw waveform, we model features produced by a parametric vocoder that separates the influence of pitch and timbre. This allows conveniently modifying pitch to match any target melody, facilitates training on more modest dataset sizes, and significantly reduces training and generation times. Our model makes frame-wise predictions using mixture density outputs rather than categorical outputs in order to reduce the required parameter count. As we found overfitting to be an issue with the relatively small datasets used in our experiments, we propose a method to regularize the model and make the autoregressive generation process more robust to prediction errors. Using a simple multi-stream architecture, harmonic, aperiodic and voiced/unvoiced components can all be predicted in a coherent manner. We compare our method to existing parametric statistical and state-of-the-art concatenative methods using quantitative metrics and a listening test. While naive implementations of the autoregressive generation algorithm tend to be inefficient, using a smart algorithm we can greatly speed up the process and obtain a system that's competitive in both speed and quality.

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A Neural Representation of Sketch Drawings

David Ha, Douglas Eck

We present sketch-rnn, a recurrent neural network (RNN) able to construct stroke-based drawings of common objects. The model is trained on thousands of crude human-drawn images representing hundreds of classes. We outline a framework for conditional and unconditional sketch generation, and describe new robust training methods for generating coherent sketch drawings in a vector format.

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Learning to Generate Reviews and Discovering Sentiment

Alec Radford, Rafal Jozefowicz, Ilya Sutskever

We explore the properties of byte-level recurrent language models. When given sufficient amounts of capacity, training data, and compute time, the representations learned by these models include disentangled features corresponding to high-level concepts. Specifically, we find a single unit which performs sentiment analysis. These representations, learned in an unsupervised manner, achieve state of the art on the binary subset of the Stanford Sentiment Treebank. They are also very data efficient. When using only a handful of labeled examples, our approach matches the performance of strong baselines trained on full datasets. We also demonstrate the sentiment unit has a direct influence on the generative process of the model. Simply fixing its value to be positive or negative generates samples with the corresponding positive or negative sentiment.

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Neural Audio Synthesis of Musical Notes with WaveNet Autoencoders

Jesse Engel, Cinjon Resnick, Adam Roberts, Sander Dieleman, Douglas Eck, Karen Simonyan, Mohammad Norouzi

Generative models in vision have seen rapid progress due to algorithmic improvements and the availability of high-quality image datasets. In this paper, we offer contributions in both these areas to enable similar progress in audio modeling. First, we detail a powerful new WaveNet-style autoencoder model that conditions an autoregressive decoder on temporal codes learned from the raw audio waveform. Second, we introduce NSynth, a large-scale and high-quality dataset of musical notes that is an order of magnitude larger than comparable public datasets. Using NSynth, we demonstrate improved qualitative and quantitative performance of the WaveNet autoencoder over a well-tuned spectral autoencoder baseline. Finally, we show that the model learns a manifold of embeddings that allows for morphing between instruments, meaningfully interpolating in timbre to create new types of sounds that are realistic and expressive.

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Online and Linear-Time Attention by Enforcing Monotonic Alignments

Colin Raffel, Thang Luong, Peter J. Liu, Ron J. Weiss, Douglas Eck

Recurrent neural network models with an attention mechanism have proven to be extremely effective on a wide variety of sequence-to-sequence problems. However, the fact that soft attention mechanisms perform a pass over the entire input sequence when producing each element in the output sequence precludes their use in online settings and results in a quadratic time complexity. Based on the insight that the alignment between input and output sequence elements is monotonic in many problems of interest, we propose an end-to-end differentiable method for learning monotonic alignments which, at test time, enables computing attention online and in linear time. We validate our approach on sentence summarization, machine translation, and online speech recognition problems and achieve results competitive with existing sequence-to-sequence models.

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Snapshot Ensembles: Train 1, get M for free

Gao Huang, Yixuan Li, Geoff Pleiss, Zhuang Liu, John E. Hopcroft, Kilian Q. Weinberger

Ensembles of neural networks are known to be much more robust and accurate than individual networks. However, training multiple deep networks for model averaging is computationally expensive. In this paper, we propose a method to obtain the seemingly contradictory goal of ensembling multiple neural networks at no additional training cost. We achieve this goal by training a single neural network, converging to several local minima along its optimization path and saving the model parameters. To obtain repeated rapid convergence, we leverage recent work on cyclic learning rate schedules. The resulting technique, which we refer to as Snapshot Ensembling, is simple, yet surprisingly effective. We show in a series of experiments that our approach is compatible with diverse network architectures and learning tasks. It consistently yields lower error rates than state-of-the-art single models at no additional training cost, and compares favorably with traditional network ensembles. On CIFAR-10 and CIFAR-100 our DenseNet Snapshot Ensembles obtain error rates of 3.4% and 17.4% respectively.

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Improved Training of Wasserstein GANs

Ishaan Gulrajani, Faruk Ahmed, Martin Arjovsky, Vincent Dumoulin, Aaron Courville

Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) are powerful generative models, but suffer from training instability. The recently proposed Wasserstein GAN (WGAN) makes significant progress toward stable training of GANs, but can still generate low-quality samples or fail to converge in some settings. We find that these training failures are often due to the use of weight clipping in WGAN to enforce a Lipschitz constraint on the critic, which can lead to pathological behavior. We propose an alternative method for enforcing the Lipschitz constraint: instead of clipping weights, penalize the norm of the gradient of the critic with respect to its input. Our proposed method converges faster and generates higher-quality samples than WGAN with weight clipping. Finally, our method enables very stable GAN training: for the first time, we can train a wide variety of GAN architectures with almost no hyperparameter tuning, including 101-layer ResNets and language models over discrete data.

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BEGAN: Boundary Equilibrium Generative Adversarial Networks

David Berthelot, Tom Schumm, Luke Metz

We propose a new equilibrium enforcing method paired with a loss derived from the Wasserstein distance for training auto-encoder based Generative Adversarial Networks. This method balances the generator and discriminator during training. Additionally, it provides a new approximate convergence measure, fast and stable training and high visual quality. We also derive a way of controlling the trade-off between image diversity and visual quality. We focus on the image generation task, setting a new milestone in visual quality, even at higher resolutions. This is achieved while using a relatively simple model architecture and a standard training procedure.

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Finding News Citations for Wikipedia

Besnik Fetahu, Katja Markert, Wolfgang Nejdl, Avishek Anand

An important editing policy in Wikipedia is to provide citations for added statements in Wikipedia pages, where statements can be arbitrary pieces of text, ranging from a sentence to a paragraph. In many cases citations are either outdated or missing altogether. In this work we address the problem of finding and updating news citations for statements in entity pages. We propose a two-stage supervised approach for this problem. In the first step, we construct a classifier to find out whether statements need a news citation or other kinds of citations (web, book, journal, etc.). In the second step, we develop a news citation algorithm for Wikipedia statements, which recommends appropriate citations from a given news collection. Apart from IR techniques that use the statement to query the news collection, we also formalize three properties of an appropriate citation, namely: (i) the citation should entail the Wikipedia statement, (ii) the statement should be central to the citation, and (iii) the citation should be from an authoritative source. We perform an extensive evaluation of both steps, using 20 million articles from a real-world news collection. Our results are quite promising, and show that we can perform this task with high precision and at scale.

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Tacotron: A Fully End-to-End Text-To-Speech Synthesis Model

Yuxuan Wang, RJ Skerry-Ryan, Daisy Stanton, Yonghui Wu, Ron J. Weiss, Navdeep Jaitly, Zongheng Yang, Ying Xiao, Zhifeng Chen, Samy Bengio, Quoc Le, Yannis Agiomyrgiannakis, Rob Clark, Rif A. Saurous

A text-to-speech synthesis system typically consists of multiple stages, such as a text analysis frontend, an acoustic model and an audio synthesis module. Building these components often requires extensive domain expertise and may contain brittle design choices. In this paper, we present Tacotron, an end-to-end generative text-to-speech model that synthesizes speech directly from characters. Given <text, audio> pairs, the model can be trained completely from scratch with random initialization. We present several key techniques to make the sequence-to-sequence framework perform well for this challenging task. Tacotron achieves a 3.82 subjective 5-scale mean opinion score on US English, outperforming a production parametric system in terms of naturalness. In addition, since Tacotron generates speech at the frame level, it's substantially faster than sample-level autoregressive methods.

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Scaling the Scattering Transform: Deep Hybrid Networks

Edouard Oyallon, Eugene Belilovsky, Sergey Zagoruyko

We use the scattering network as a generic and fixed initialization of the first layers of a supervised hybrid deep network. We show that early layers do not necessarily need to be learned, providing the best results to-date with pre-defined representations while being competitive with Deep CNNs. Using a shallow cascade of 1x1 convolutions, which encodes scattering coefficients that correspond to spatial windows of very small sizes, permits to obtain AlexNet accuracy on the imagenet ILSVRC2012. We demonstrate that this local encoding explicitly learns in-variance w.r.t. rotations. Combining scattering networks with a modern ResNet, we achieve a single-crop top 5 error of 11.4% on imagenet ILSVRC2012, comparable to the Resnet-18 architecture, while utilizing only 10 layers. We also find that hybrid architectures can yield excellent performance in the small sample regime, exceeding their end-to-end counterparts, through their ability to incorporate geometrical priors. We demonstrate this on subsets of the CIFAR-10 dataset and by setting a new state-of-the-art on the STL-10 dataset.

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Sequence-to-Sequence Models Can Directly Transcribe Foreign Speech

Ron J. Weiss, Jan Chorowski, Navdeep Jaitly, Yonghui Wu, Zhifeng Chen

We present a recurrent encoder-decoder deep neural network architecture that directly translates speech in one language into text in another. The model does not explicitly transcribe the speech into text in the source language, nor does it require supervision from the ground truth source language transcription during training. We apply a slightly modified sequence-to-sequence with attention architecture that has previously been used for speech recognition and show that it can be repurposed for this more complex task, illustrating the power of attention-based models. A single model trained end-to-end obtains state-of-the-art performance on the Fisher Callhome Spanish-English speech translation task, outperforming a cascade of independently trained sequence-to-sequence speech recognition and machine translation models by 1.8 BLEU points on the Fisher test set. In addition, we find that making use of the training data in both languages by multi-task training sequence-to-sequence speech translation and recognition models with a shared encoder network can improve performance by a further 1.4 BLEU points.

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One-Shot Imitation Learning

Yan Duan, Marcin Andrychowicz, Bradly Stadie, Jonathan Ho, Jonas Schneider, Ilya Sutskever, Pieter Abbeel, Wojciech Zaremba

Imitation learning has been commonly applied to solve different tasks in isolation. This usually requires either careful feature engineering, or a significant number of samples. This is far from what we desire: ideally, robots should be able to learn from very few demonstrations of any given task, and instantly generalize to new situations of the same task, without requiring task-specific engineering. In this paper, we propose a meta-learning framework for achieving such capability, which we call one-shot imitation learning. Specifically, we consider the setting where there is a very large set of tasks, and each task has many instantiations. For example, a task could be to stack all blocks on a table into a single tower, another task could be to place all blocks on a table into two-block towers, etc. In each case, different instances of the task would consist of different sets of blocks with different initial states. At training time, our algorithm is presented with pairs of demonstrations for a subset of all tasks. A neural net is trained that takes as input one demonstration and the current state (which initially is the initial state of the other demonstration of the pair), and outputs an action with the goal that the resulting sequence of states and actions matches as closely as possible with the second demonstration. At test time, a demonstration of a single instance of a new task is presented, and the neural net is expected to perform well on new instances of this new task. The use of soft attention allows the model to generalize to conditions and tasks unseen in the training data. We anticipate that by training this model on a much greater variety of tasks and settings, we will obtain a general system that can turn any demonstrations into robust policies that can accomplish an overwhelming variety of tasks. Videos available at https://bit.ly/one-shot-imitation.

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Mask R-CNN

Kaiming He, Georgia Gkioxari, Piotr Dollár, Ross Girshick

We present a conceptually simple, flexible, and general framework for object instance segmentation. Our approach efficiently detects objects in an image while simultaneously generating a high-quality segmentation mask for each instance. The method, called Mask R-CNN, extends Faster R-CNN by adding a branch for predicting an object mask in parallel with the existing branch for bounding box recognition. Mask R-CNN is simple to train and adds only a small overhead to Faster R-CNN, running at 5 fps. Moreover, Mask R-CNN is easy to generalize to other tasks, e.g., allowing us to estimate human poses in the same framework. We show top results in all three tracks of the COCO suite of challenges, including instance segmentation, bounding-box object detection, and person keypoint detection. Without tricks, Mask R-CNN outperforms all existing, single-model entries on every task, including the COCO 2016 challenge winners. We hope our simple and effective approach will serve as a solid baseline and help ease future research in instance-level recognition. Code will be made available.

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